E80 Spring 2014

The Final Project

Objective

By the end of the laboratory the student will:

  1. Create an experimental plan with scientific and/or engineering objectives.
  2. Design, prototype, test, and build an instrument package to achieve the objectives.
  3. Fly the experiments, gather and analyze the data from each one.
  4. Revise the experimental and flight plan for succeeding launches based on lessons learned from each flight.

Before You Begin – Things you have to fit in

The following things are not explicitly sequenced in the lab sessions. Nevertheless, you have to accomplish them before you launch. Plan accordingly:

  1. Calibrate your sensors. Whether this step needs to be done before you breadboard, while on the breadboard, or after they've been soldered to the PC board depends on the sensor and how you plan on processing the data, but you will need to verify the operation of your sensors and if necessary determine calibration constants. The pressure sensor calibration is described at the bottom of this old page.
  2. Assemble your rocket. Your kit needs to be assembled at some point. Make absolutely certain that you follow all college regulations regarding ventilation and skin protection for adhesives. Sign for your kit in the book by the kits. There is a set of step-by-step instructions for the X-Calibur (even though it says Phobos) here. There is a set of step-by-step instructions for the Barracuda (also useful for the Arreaux) here. I even agree with most (but not all) of the instructions.
Table of Assigned Rockets
Team Rocket Rocksim File OpenRocket File Solidworks of Payload
Team 1 Aerotech Barracuda aerotech_barracuda.rkt aerotech_barracuda.ork AerotechParts.zip
Team 2 Aerotech Arreaux aerotech_arreaux.rkt aerotech_arreaux.ork AerotechParts.zip
Team 3 Aerotech Barracuda aerotech_barracuda.rkt aerotech_barracuda.ork AerotechParts.zip
Team 4 PML Phobos phobos_38mm_hamr_hmc.rkt phobos_38mm_hamr_hmc.ork PMLParts.zip
Team 5 PML X-Calibur x-calibur_hamr_hmc.rkt x-calibur_hamr_hmc.ork PMLParts.zip

 

There are modifications to the included plans. For the Phobos or X-Calibur they include:

For the Arreaux or Barracuda they include:

  1. Modify your rocket. Your instrumentation package will probably require some modification to the payload section or the nose cone. You need to design and make the modifications and verify they are structurally sound and function as intended. Walter Cook wants you to include some cushioning or shock absorpancy to protect the data loggers. We have a few extra nose cones and payload sections to allow for mistakes.
  2. Paint your rocket. Your rocket will function if not painted, but painting lends a finished and professional look.
  3. Learn how your data logger works and work out the data flow from sensor to data logger to computer to final report.

Budget: We have a list of parts and sensors that were purchased for the E80 labs and for your use. The parts on the list or parts in the E80 lab or Engineering Stockroom you may use without regard to budget. However, if they run out, let us know. Your team has a $50 budget for parts and sensors that are not on the list or in the stockroom. The budget is intended for parts, sensors, and construction supplies. It is not intended for motors. We have a list of potential sensors to get you started. If you want parts from DigiKey or Mouser turn in an order sheet and we'll order them. You do not have to include Digikey or Mouser shipping in your budget. If you want to order parts from other vendors, you are responsible for ordering the parts and getting them in by the second week. The shipping has to be included in the $50 budget. Turn in a reimbursement sheet. You'll want to get your parts ordered early so you can have them by your second lab session.

Lottery: There will be a lottery or draft for selecting the remaining motors on Tuesday, 9 APR 2013 at 9:35 AM. Each team will select four motors: two for the first launch day, and two for the second. The team order will be chosen by the luck of the draw. Rounds 3 and 4 will go in reverse order from rounds 1 and 2. For each of the four rounds each team will get one selection in turn. The motors from which you can choose are listed in a table below, so you can come prepared to select the motors you want for your flight. Rocksim or OpenRocket may help you prepare.

G69N-P: We have 13 G69N-P motors available for your use on a first-come first-serve basis. They won't count against your four flight motors, but they only fit in the PML rockets. They require electronic ignition of the ejection charge. We have two Aerotech EFC-1's that can be used to that end.

Data Logger: Your team gets one data logger to use for the course of the lab. Sign for your data logger in the same book as for your rocket kit. We want it back at the end. If you manage to fry it or destroy it, your team gets to put in $25 apiece towards the replacement cost. The data loggers are new this year and have much superior performance to previous years' data loggers. The current loggers have sixteen channels of sixteen-bit resolution, and a composite sample rate of about 400 kSPS. If you use all sixteen channels at the maximum rate, you have a sample rate of 25 kSPS and a Nyquist frequency of 12.5 kHz for each channel. The user manual is here. The layout of the data logger is here. The schematic is here.

You have to format your microSD as a FAT32 disk with 4k or 8k block sizes, which is fairly straightforward with Windows. It can be done on a Mac in the terminal window using the diskutil command. If you aren't a unix guru, don't try it on a mac. Do not edit the configuration file on a Mac unless you use BBEdit or TextWrangler. Other programs will make the configuration file unreadable for the data logger. We have two VIs and two MATLAB .m files for reading the data files. The first VI, ReadBinaryFileMuddLog16.vi, asks for the .dat or .DAT file, and then reads the file and plots the data in a window. The second VI, ReadPortionBinaryFileMuddLog16.vi, asks for the .dat or .DAT file, and then reads the portion of the file indicated by the start and stop times and plots the data in a window. It is most useful for reading a portion of a file that is too big to fit into memory all at once, or for reading just the flight portion of a data file. The first .m file contains a function, ReadBinaryFileTX, that generates 2D arrays of the sample times and the sample values in that order. The second .m file contains a function, ReadBinaryFileXT, that generates 2D arrays of the sample values and the sample times in that order (the opposite of the first function.

Video Camera: We have a #11 Keychain Camera available for each team to use during launch. They record 720P video to microSD cards. We want it back at the end. You will want to consider carefully how you want to mount one on your rocket if you want to use one. Since they don't use telemetry, you have to recover the microSD card to see the video. The manual (such as it is) is here. We have style number 2. We have flight videos from thses cameras here, here, and here.

Section 1 – An Experimental Plan – Due at end of first lab

By the end of the first Final Project lab session, you need to have your section professor and Professor Spjut approve your complete schematics (including the 0.1 µF capacitors on the power supply lines) and list of parts for your flight experiments. The steps to get you there are:

  1. Determine your science and/or engineering goals. What do you want to measure and why? Will you measure atmospheric phenomena such as temperature, pressure, humidity, trace gas concentration, particulate count, or wind speed? Will you measure rocket performance data such as altitude, velocity, acceleration, vibration, rotation rate, internal temperatures, or in-flight events, such as parachute ejection and landing? Are there novel things you want to try such as using an optical sensor to measure rotation rate?
  2. Determine what sensors or means you will use to achieve your science and/or engineering goals. You need to use at least two different types of sensors, one of which is recommended to have at least a 1 kHz bandwidth, and you have a maximum of sixteen channels of data that you can measure. A stand-alone altimeter or video camera doesn't count towards your minimum of two, but does count against your maximum count of sixteen.
  3. Determine if the response time of your sensors and the limitations of your data logger will permit you to make the measurements you want. You may need to use Rocksim or OpenRocket, atmospheric models, and 1st-order response models to determine transients. This link is a VI to process a data set through a 1st-order model. The test data file for it is here. To see to what degree you can recover your original signal, you can play with the first-oder deconvolution VI here.
  4. Determine what circuitry you will need to power the sensors and condition the outputs so that they will interface with the data logger. Analog Devices has a handy application note on single-sided power for op amps.
  5. Generate a complete parts list and complete schematics (e.g., power and bypass capacitors for op-amps) for your sensors and signal conditioning.
  6. Discuss what you will need to process the data.
  7. Have your section professor and Professor Spjut approve the documentation of your plans.
  8. If there are any non-standard parts that you will need, for Digikey or Mouser fill out a purchase order slip and give it to a proctor or your section professor. Use multiple sheets if you need. For other sites, you are responsible for ordering and getting reimbursed after they come in.

Section 2 – Breadboard and Test– Due at end of second lab

Before you commit your design to final flight hardware, you need to make sure your design works. Fit all of your desired components except for the battery, the data logger, and any power regulators, on a single breadboard. Use proper breadboard technique where you trim resistors, capacitors, and other components to get them close to the breadboard, keep the interconnecting leads short, and use the power busses for power. Measure the current draw (with a multimeter) of your completed circuit and calculate the mAh required for your circuit to operate for one hour, and size your battery or batteries accordingly. Test your data logging on a USB DAQ and computer before you test it on the data logger to make sure the signals are in the 0-to-3.3V range. You can place the data logger, battery, and voltage regulators on a second breadboard. The data logger is too big for both sides to fit on a breadboard. Connect it so that the 20-pin side is on the breadboard, and the 5-pin side is hanging off.

Make sure everything works. Demonstrate that it functions to your section professor and Professor Spjut. You need to get approval on your functioning design by the end of the second Final Project lab session. If you have parts that haven't arrived, you'll have to get permission of your section instructor to delay the demonstration of functionality to the third session.

Section 3 – Mounted Flight Package- Due at end of third lab

Once your breadboarded design functions and is approved by your section professor transfer everything over to your flight PC board and solder it into place. Sign for your PC board in the same book as for the data logger and the rocket kit. The top of the PC board is identical to your breadboard with two exceptions: The four outside power busses are slightly nearer the five-pin rows on the breadboard, and there is an extra power bus that runs up the center of the board, that you can use or not use as you see fit. There is a section in the middle of the PC board designed to accept a 7805 +5V voltage regulator, and up to three other voltage regulators. The bottom of the board has mounting sockets for the data logger. Do not solder the data logger to the PC board. Simply put it in the sockets. The mounting holes on the PC board will accept either 4-40 or M3 screws. We have a fairly large collection of both 4-40 and M3 machine screws, bolts, and spacers available.

All of your circuitry has to fit on one PC board, with the exception of remote sensors, which must have leads going to the PC board. Once your circuitry has been transferred and soldered, test everything to make sure it still works. Once you have fixed any errors, demonstrate that your system functions to your section professor and Professor Spjut.

Section 4 – Flight Ready- Due at end of fourth lab

Even once your PC-boarded sensor and data logger package is working, you still need to get it on your rocket and make sure everything is ready. In addition, you need to actually perform a complete run-through of the launch checklist (PML or Aerotech). You will load an empty motor casing instead of a loaded motor. Otherwise, you will complete the checklist. Launch pads will be available in the lab. The PML launch checklist is found here. The Aerotech launch checklist is found here. A copy of the Flight Card is found here (PML or Aerotech). You may want to write and test any VIs or software processing routinesyou will need, so that you will be able to quickly check your flight data.

You also need to have a list of flight objectives for each flight and have it reviewed by your section professor or Professor Spjut.

To repeat: You want to be completely ready for pre-flight, flight, and data processing, and you want to have a complete run through of everything you will do in the field. It is much easier to debug and correct faulty procedures in the lab than on the high desert.

If your motors are not already pre-assembled, we'll want you to assemble and label your two motors for a given week in the lab session preceeding the flight day. Motor assembly instructions are found here.

Important: You need to check the flight characteristics of your finished rocket in Rocksim or OpenRocket with the motors you will fly. The "M" delay is approximately 10 seconds. The "L" delay is approximately 14 seconds. If you need a delay longer than 10 seconds, check to see if we have an "L" delay available for your specific motor. Either the "M" or the "L" delay can be modified to burn shorter than the standard time. Again, RockSim or OpenRocket are excellent tools for helping you decide if you want to shorten the delay so that the 'chute pops out at apogee and not back on the ground. It's easiest to modify the delay time before you assemble the motor. We have two Aerotech RMS Delay Drilling Tools for adjusting the delays.

Section 5 – Launch

The buses to the Lucerne Valley launch site will leave from Foothill Blvd. in front of Parsons at exactly 6 AM on both 19 APR 2014 and 26 APR 2014. oou should be there at least 15 minutes early. Anyone missing the bus will be responsible for getting themselves to the launch site. The GPS coordinates are N34° 29' 48.7" W116° 57' 30.2" which can be entered directly into Google Maps. We will have a simple breakfast, lunch, and water available. We will bring the E80 laptops and all of the loaded motors with us. We will also have sunscreen. Anything else you think you will need, you should bring with you. We will not pick up your rockets for you, you need to carry them. You are welcome to bring your own laptops. The desert mornings start off quite cool but the temperature may be hot before we leave. Dress accordingly. There is limited shade and no seating beyond what you bring for yourself.

At the launch site, assist with any final set up of the facilities, and then start prepping your rocket. The goal is to have the turnaround time be 1 hour per flight, but safety and accuracy trump speed. Please observe the safety barriers, pay attention to the Public Address system, and obey any directions from the Range Safety Officer(RSO) or the Launch Control Officer (LCO). The launch will be conducted according to the High Power Rocket Safety Code.

For each of your flights you will need to complete a launch checklist (PML or Aerotech) and fill out a Flight Card(PML or Aerotech) and get it initialed by the Range Safety Officer (RSO), who will inspect your rocket and verify that your checklist is complete. You can then present the card and the rocket to the Launch Control Officer (LCO) to be assigned a launch pad. A copy of the Flight Card is found here (PML or Aerotech).

You will want to assign one team member as a spotter who is assigned to stand some distance from the launch pad (at least 1000 feet for flights with apogees over 1000 feet, and at least the apogee distance for flight under 1000 feet) whose only responsibility is to follow the rocket during flight and recover the rocket after flight. The inclinometers from the First Flight lab will be available if you want to use them. There is one handheld GPS unit that can be shared among all of the teams to record locations as desired.

Section 6 – Recovery and Analysis

As mentioned on the checklist, you should record the location where the rocket landed if the GPS (or your own GPS) is available. You should inspect the rocket for damage. After you download the data in all of the forms required on the checklist and have reported any damage to the RSO, start prepping for your second flight.

It would be wise to use the time before your next flight to examine your data and do some preliminary analysis on them to see if you have met your objectives for the flight. You can be as thorough in your analysis as time and your computing power allows. You may want to modify your flight plan according to the data that you have analyzed.

If a major hardware failure keeps you from getting data from one or more flights, you need to let us know.

 

Section 7 – Repair and Re-fly

The week in between launches is for you to figure out what went wrong, fix it, and prepare for your next round. If everything went right and you're already all set for your second week, enjoy it. It will be the last time in your life. For us normal mortals, something didn't behave as we expected, or we learned something that made us ask a new question. Take the time to think about what you have accomplished, what you want to accomplish, and how best to bring it to pass.

We'll want you to assemble and label your two motors for a given week in the lab session preceeding the flight day.

Important: You need to check the flight characteristics of your finished rocket in Rocksim or OpenRocket with the motors you will fly. The "M" delay is approximately 10 seconds. The "L" delay is approximately 14 seconds. If you need a delay longer than 10 seconds, check to see if we have an "L" delay available for your specific motor. Either the "M" or the "L" delay can be modified to burn shorter than the standard time. Again, RockSim or OpenRocket are excellent tools for helping you decide if you want to shorten the delay so that the 'chute pops out at apogee and not back on the ground. It's easiest to modify the delay time before you assemble the motor. We have two Aerotech RMS Delay Drilling Tools for adjusting the delays.

Section 8 – Write Up

The sixth week of the project is for writing your Final Report and preparing your Final Presentation.

Other Information

We will have two sets of launch stands at Lucerne Valley. The set of five we used for First Launch, and the set of five launch rails. The set of five from First Launch will have launch rods of 1/8", 3/16", and 1/4" diameter. We can get other diameters if you need. They are limited to rockets under 1500 grams, with G or smaller motors. The five launch rails require linear launch rail lugs, and must be used for H or larger motors. You can also fly G or smaller from them as long as your rocket has linear launch rail lugs.

As long as you stay within your $50 budget, you are not limited to the rocket kits from class. If you have a justifiable science or engineering objective you can buy, make, and fly any other rocket you would like, using G or smaller motors. If you want to fly your Quest Seeker again (with or without the altimeter) you can do so. In addition, if you want to buy, build, and fly a rocket just for fun, you are welcome to do so. The restrictions are:

For Project Related Rockets:

For Personal Rockets:

 

Existing Parts (needs updating)

Supply on 25 MAR 2013 Part Number Name/Description Manufacturer Supply Voltage Output Range Some Uses
201 TL081 IC OPAMP   ±4V to ±18V ±3V to ± 16V General Purpose Op Amp, buffer, gain, transimpedance, filter
146 OP-07 IC OPAMP   ±3V to ±22V ±1V to ±12.6V General Purpose Op Amp, buffer, gain, transimpedance, filter
46 OPA551PA IC OPAMP GP 3MHZ SGL HV 8DIP Texas Instruments ±4V to ±30V ±2V to ± 28V High-current output Op Amp, buffer, gain, filter, drive high-current load
5 MCP6002-I/P IC OPAMP 1.8V 1MHZ DUAL 8-DIP Microchip Technology 1.8V to 6V SS 1.8V to 6V Battery-powered Op Amp, buffer, gain, transimpedance, filter
151 MCP6004-I/P IC OPAMP QUAD 1.8V 14DIP Microchip Technology 1.8V to 6V SS 1.8V to 6V Battery-powered Op Amp, buffer, gain, transimpedance, filter
124 MCP601-I/P IC OPAMP SNGL SUPPLY R-R 8DIP Microchip Technology 2.7V to 6V SS 2.7V to 6V Battery-powered Op Amp, buffer, gain, transimpedance, filter
48 AD623ANZ IC AMP INST R-R LP 8DIP Analog Devices 3V to 12V SS 3V to 12V Battery-powered Instrumentation Amp, pure gain, 1 ≤ G ≤ 1000
76 7805 Voltage Regulator   7V to 35V 5V Voltage regulator, supply power at 5V, up to 1A
60 MCP1702-3302E/TO IC REG LDO 3.3V 250MA TO-92-3 Microchip Technology 4V to 13.2V 3.3V Voltage regulator, supply power or virtual ground at 3.3V
104 MCP1702-3002E/TO IC REG LDO 3V 250MA TO-92-3 Microchip Technology 3.7V to 13.2V 3V Voltage regulator, supply power or virtual ground at 3V
208 MCP1702-2502E/TO IC REG LDO 2.5V 250MA TO-92-3 Microchip Technology 3.2V to 13.2V 2.5V Voltage regulator, supply power or virtual ground at 2.5V
173 MCP1702-1802E/TO IC REG LDO 1.8V 250MA TO-92-3 Microchip Technology 2.7V to 13.2V 1.8V Voltage regulator, supply power or virtual ground at 1.8V
68 MCP1702-1502E/TO IC REG LDO 1.5V 250MA TO-92-3 Microchip Technology 2.7V to 13.2V 1.5V Voltage regulator, supply power or virtual ground at 1.5V
10 SEN-09412 Gyro Breakout Board - LPR5150AL Dual 1500°/s Sparkfun 2.7V to 3.6V 0 to 3V IMU, rate gyro (x & y axes)
10 SEN-09425 Gyro Breakout Board - LPY5150AL Dual 1500°/s Sparkfun 2.7V to 3.6V 0 to 3V IMU, rate gyro (x & z axes)
10 SEN-09652 Triple Axis Accelerometer Breakout - MMA7361 Sparkfun 2.2V to 3.6V 0 to 3V IMU, 3-axis accelerometer, ±1.6g, ±6g
10 876-1002-ND ADXL335Z EVAL BOARD Digikey 1.8V to 3.6V 0 to 3V IMU, 3-axis accelerometer, ±3g
10 MMA2201EG SENSOR ACCEL X-AXIS+/-40G 16SOIC Freescale 5V 0 to 5V IMU, High-g acceleration measurements
200 ft. TT-E-40-200 40 AWG Type E thermocouple wire Omega Engineering N/A 6.998 mV @ 100°C Temperature measurement, fast response time
200 ft. FF-E-24-200 24 AWG Type E thermocouple wire Omega Engineering N/A 6.998 mV @ 100°C Temperature measurement, moderate response time
250 NTCLE100E3104JB0 THERMISTOR NTC 100K OHM LEADED Vishay N/A 100kΩ @ 25°C Cold Junction Compensation, Temperature Measurement
25 MCP9701A-E/TO IC SENSOR THERMAL 3.1V TO-92-3 Microchip Technology 3.1V to 5.5V 400mV + 19.5mV/°C Cold Junction Compensation, Temperature Measurement
44 MPX53DP SENSOR DIFF PRESS 7.25PSI MAX Freescale 3V to 6V 0 to 60mV Pitot Static tube, Differential Pressure Measurement
47 MPXA6115AC7U DIP Absolute Pressure Sensor 16.7 PSI Freescale 5V 0 to 4.75V Altimeter, Barometer
62 BPW46 PHOTODIODE PIN FLAT SIDE VIEW Vishay N/A See Data Sheet Light Intensity Measurement, irradiance, light scatter
57 OP950 PHOTODIODE PIN 935NM SIDELOOK TT Electronics/Optek Technology N/A See Data Sheet Light Intensity Measurement, irradiance, light scatter
205   Red LED   20 mA Unknown Light source, light scattering measurements
125   Green LED   20 mA Unknown Light source, light scattering measurements
250   Yellow LED   20 mA Unknown Light source, light scattering measurements
360 SR205E104MAR CAP CER .10UF 50V 20% RADIAL AVX Corp. 50V max N/A Power Supply Bypass
50 123-4016-GR 9V T Battery Snap Mouser 9V 9V Connect 9V battery
20 WIG-10216 Logomatic 8 Channel Data Logger Sparkfun 3.6V to 7.5V 3.3V 8 channel data logger. 10-bit ADC. Measurement range 0 – 3.3V
2 WIG-09228 uLog 3 Channel Data Logger Sparkfun 3.3 V N/A 3 channel data logger. 10-bit ADC. Measurement range 0 – 3.3V
9 LM555CNFS IC OSC MONO TIMING 8-DIP Fairchild 4.5V to 16V VS – 2V Timer, Pulse Train Generator, Pulse Generator
25 ICM7555IPAZ IC OSC MONO TIMING 1MHZ 8DIP Intersil 2V to 18V VS – 1V Improved 555-style Timer, Pulse Train Generator, Pulse Generator
3 XR2209CP-F IC FUNCTION GENERATOR 8PDIP Exar 8V to 26V Varies Square Wave or Triangle Wave Generator
30   10 Position .1" Female Headers       Socketing for IMU2 or IMU3, requres 2
2 HCH-1000-001 Capacitive Humidity Sensor        
7 Various Assorted Gas Sensors        
5   Gas Sensor Sockets        
3   Sharp Dust Sensor        
6   Vibration Sensor Measurement Specialties Inc.      
23   Vibration Sensor/Dynamic Strain Gauge Measurement Specialties Inc.      
81   Vibration Sensor/Dynamic Strain Gauge w/adhesive Measurement Specialties Inc. N/A up to 20V+  

 

A Partial List of Potential Sensors

The sensors listed below are potential sensors to use on your final project. The list is not exhaustive. Additional places to look are Digikey, Mouser, Sparkfun, Component Distributors, and others. Component Distributors takes about 10 days to deliver, but they have some good gas sensors.

Sensor Type Manufacturer DigiKey P/N

Cost

Humidity Sensor Honeywell 480-3294-1-ND $11.47
Humidity Sensor Honeywell 480-3536-ND $20.24
Vibration Sensor MSI 605-00004-ND $2.49
Photoresistor Digikey PDV-P9004-ND $1.51
Dust Sensor Sharp 425-2068-ND

$10.63

Carbon Dioxide CO2 Sensor Parallax 605-00010-ND $26.59
Carbon Dioxide CO2 Sensor Futurlec   $19.90
Carbon Monoxide (CO) Sensor Parallax 605-00007-ND $6.37
Carbon Monoxide (CO) Sensor Futurlec   $8.90
Methane Sensor Parallax 605-00008-ND $4.99
Ozone (O3) Sensor Futurlec   $12.90
Air Quality Control Sensor Futurlec   $6.90
Analog Compass: 1655, 1525 Robson/Dinsmore   $39

 

The Assigned Motors

19-APR-2014
26-APR-2014
Sec 1 Team 1 H165R-M, G77R-M Sec 1 Team 1H165R-M, G77R-M
Sec 1 Team 2 H165R-M, G79W-M Sec 1 Team 2H165R-M, G77R-M
Sec 1 Team 3 H128W-M, G75J-M Sec 1 Team 3H128W-M, G75J-M
Sec 1 Team 4 I357T-M, H123W-M Sec 1 Team 4I161W-M, H242T-M
Sec 1 Team 5 I218R-M, H112J-M Sec 1 Team 5I357T-M, H73J-M
Sec 2 Team 1H128W-M, G79W-M Sec 2 Team 1H128W-M, G79W-M
Sec 2 Team 2 G79W-M, G79W-M  Sec 2 Team 2G79W-M, G79W-M
Sec 2 Team 3H238T-M, G79W-M  Sec 2 Team 3H238T-M, G79W-M
Sec 3 Team 1H165R-M, G79W-M  Sec 3 Team 1H128W-M, H238T-M
Sec 3 Team 2H170M-14A, H73J-M  Sec 3 Team 2I245G-M, H178DM-14A
Sec 3 Team 3 H128W-M, H238T-M   Sec 3 Team 3 H238T-M, G79W-M
Sec 4 Team 1G79W-M, G79W-M Sec 4 Team 1G79W-M, G79W-M
Sec 4 Team 2G75J-M, G75J-M Sec 4 Team 2G75J-M, G75J-M
Sec 4 Team 3H238T-M, G77R-M Sec 4 Team 3H165R-M, G79W-M
Sec 4 Team 4 H112J-M, H73J-M Sec 4 Team 4H112J-M, H73J-M
Sec 4 Team 5I245G-M, H73J-M Sec 4 Team 5I245G-M, H73J-M

The Motors Available for Launch

Motor Casing Total Impulse 19-APR-14 26-APR-14
For Aerotech Rockets
G77R-M 29/120 105 6 6
G79W-M 29/120 109 6 6
G75J-M 29/180 136 3 3
H165R-M 29/180 165 3 3
H238T-M 29/180 166 3 3
H128W-M 29/180 173 3 3
For PML Rockets
H73J-M 38/240 186 4 3
H148R-M 38/240 206 0 1
H123W-M 38/240 224 1 0
H242T-M 38/240 232 0 1
H112J-M 38/360 261 1 0
H178DM-14A 38/360 283 0 1
H170M-14A 38/360 320 1 0
I161W-M 38/360 329 0 1
I218R-M 38/360 330 1 0
I357T-M 38/360 342 1 1
I245G-M 38/360 351 1 2

 

 

A lottery will be held for the motors on Tuesday, 8 APR 2014 at 9:35 AM.

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